Friday, May 28, 2010

McCall 8629 - Ladies One-Piece Seamless Apron


Late nineteen-teens to about 1920.

Although this apron is seamless, you're still going to have to piece the fabric if you're using narrow fabric, but otherwise, this is a very simple pattern, and probably very popular.

Although there is a certain satisfaction in purchasing a pristine, unused pattern, patterns that have seen some use have stories to tell us.  This pattern is well-used, with multiple tears in the pattern tissue and one small torn-off piece that was carefully pinned back on.  If the pattern pieces could speak, I'd love to know how many times this apron pattern was made up.



The maker has penciled in a shorter cutting line, as well as the line along the side where the apron will need to be pieced.


It's a little hard to see but you can just see that the artist has indicated rick-rack trim on the short version:


Rick-rack seems to have been a very common trimming for aprons.  Nu-fashond rick-rack was a common brand in the 1920s.  Sewing patterns from this period seldom mention notions and trimming, but sewing books of the period frequently mention trimming house or bungalow aprons with rick-rack.








6/18/2010 - Update.  I had a free Saturday so I took the time to make this up in a very cheery remnant I found last year.  Fortunately, because the print is so incredibly busy, you don't really notice that I didn't have enough material to match the side pieces or the pockets (if you look closely, though, you can see where the trelliswork doesn't exactly match.)  Unfortunately, I see now that the print wasn't precisely centered on the fabric, so the design is about 3 inches off center, darn it.  This fabric was 45 inches wide, so I had to piece the sides.  I finished these seams with a flat fell.






The approximate circumference at the bottom of the armholes is 36 inches.  

The very brief instructions indicate that if preferred, you may underface the edges, so I think the expectation would be that you would bind them.  I decided to underface with lavender gingham bias that I'd cut for the purpose.  Here you can see that I've pinned the folded bias on, but basted it through the deep front curve, since I think that gives me more control as I'm sewing.


11 comments:

Vande Historic Costuming said...

Oooo, I can just imagine how much fluff would collect in the bottom of those pointed pockets - however - they do look very nice!

Persuaded said...

This looks extremely similar to a current apron pattern by (I think Daisy Kingdom.) I call it the "mobius apron" because the crossing of the straps in the back makes the apron into a sort of mobius strip. I have made that apron up multiple times and love it, but honestly the shape of your apron pattern is infinitely more adorable.

Once again, I leave your blog consumed with envy. ;-)

Latter-Day Flapper said...

I love these crossed-strap, cover-everything aprons. No buttons or buttonholes, no tight ties, no slipping off my shoulders. My personal apron is McCall's 3063, which is from 1971 but is similar to many of these 1910's-1920's baggy aprons. I skipped the buttons on the straps and just sewed them all together.

andrea.at.the.blue.door said...

Persuaded I gave that Daisy Kingdom pattern to a friend of mine and she also called it the mobius pattern! She reports that it's very comfortable. I'll get around to making it up myself...someday.

Vande I think that as a general rule fluff is attracted to apron pockets; I think it's possible that it uses pockets as a protected breeding grounds.

Latter-Day That's a good apron. The nice thing about sewing for yourself is that you don't need to make a garment adjustable; it only needs to fit you! It's interesting that good designs are really persistent. Some of the apron and smock patterns have a multi-generational run. I think that's great.

punkin said...

I like this style very much. I will have to see if I can find a pattern to purchase that is similar

Mary said...

This is my ideal type of apron in almost every way--no neck tie, no waist tie. The only draw back could be the buttons, but by having two on each strap they are probably less likely to pull out.

I personally use a pattern that I created that is based on the horseshoe back top without the usual waist ties, but after seeing this, I think it is back to the drafting table to create a new pattern.

andrea.at.the.blue.door said...

For those of interested in drafting this up based on the layout, I can tell you that the Center Front length is 43."

Freyalyn said...

Thank you for the comment on length - I love the shape of this one, and the no-tie thing, so I think I might have to have a go at it myself. Am I right iin thinking there's no button at the back, it just sits in place by itself?

andrea.at.the.blue.door said...

Freyalyn - You are correct, this one has no ties, it hangs straight from the shoulders.

nusse.blogg.se said...

What a lovely apron! I will get right to it immediately. Aprons are my favourite piece of clothing of all.

A Bluestocking Knits said...

There is an apron "at work" in this photo from 1924:

http://www.shorpy.com/node/10307

Difficult to tell about the back of Dr. Munsell's, though.