Tuesday, February 10, 2009

May Manton's 8904 - Work Apron

The important feature to note here is the cross-over front.  If the company was working through their pattern numbers in roughly sequential order, this one would be about 1915.    I've recently acquired a four page newspaper insert for May Manton patterns dated July 1916 and the pattern numbers are in the very low 9000s.

Notice how similar this pattern is to the uniform being worn by these women. (You'll need to blow up the image a bit to see the cross over fronts, but they are certainly there!)

The same basic cross-over style was used for McCall Pattern 7986, which Past Patterns offers in a blue line copy, and this style will continue to show up into the thirties, when it gets a name of its own.


7 comments:

Shay said...

Most practical, according to my old Needlecraft magazines, because if the front became stained you could switch sides.

andrea.at.the.blue.door said...

Exactly so...I'll be posting a pattern for a1930's Hoover coverall pretty soon, and this was apparently the stated purpose of the crossover fronts.

Ruth said...

Was this also to make nursing easier? I'm currently nursing my baby and it's hard to find vintage patterns that provide easy access.

andrea.at.the.blue.door said...

Hello Ruth,

That's a really interesting point that I hadn't considered; a sack apron that closes in the back would be very inconvenient for a nursing mother.

A little later in the 1930's and 1940's, a variety of front-buttoning smock patterns show up, clearly intended for maternity wear, and these would be helpful for nursing moms as well.

Peldyn said...

Ah, I love this! I will be making up a copy of this as soon as I can draft a pattern.

LittleRedVixen said...

Is there any chance at all that you would have the cutting chart for this work apron? I have been trying to draft a pattern for it and, due to my inexperience in such things, am having a great deal of trouble doing so.

andrea.at.the.blue.door said...

The print quality on the layout drawing isn't great quality, but it should get you near what you need.

The short row of three perforations on the front is where you cut the opening for the belt to slide through (on each of the front pieces.)