Saturday, July 16, 2011

Pictorial Review 3160 - Ladies and Misses' Apron, Cap, and Cuffs


Mid 1920s.

Suitable for both nursing and general household service.  In some cases pattern companies showed maid's uniforms in their catalogs, usually toward the back of the publication, after the night clothes and under things.  It's a little startling to spend time poring over illustrations for patterns of elegant tea gowns and just a few pages later to find yourself in the territory of bungalow aprons, step-ins, and maid's uniforms.

A few years earlier in 1916, the publication Journal of Home Economics published an article entitled "Costume in the Cookery Lab," which documented the results of a 1915 survey of clothing or uniform requirements for students at colleges offering Home Economics programs.  At that time some departments recommended specific commercial patterns that their students (all young women, one imagines) could use.  Further research may reveal that nursing schools made the same sort of recommendations.  The Journal indicates that at two institutions, their students made aprons in their sewing classes.  While the students may have made their own, they may also have purchased the pattern, fabric, and findings and had their clothing made by a family member or a local dressmaker.

Pictorial patterns are wonderful quality. They come pre-cut, printed, and perforated, making them very efficient to use.  This pattern has been used.

9 comments:

somethingone said...

How fun! I've actually been *looking* for a pattern like this - spent the last hour on the internet in frustration, came here, and you had one! I've been lurking here for a while and I always appreciate your information.

Now to track down the pattern! (I want the cap for cooking in...though there's plenty of historical "mob caps" to be had, I don't quite like the look.)

Jessie said...

Hi! I've been reading for a while now and love seeing the old patterns you dig up. (This post has prompted some thoughts on the evolution of the apron which may turn into a blog post.) I tagged you for a blog award here: http://somethingsihavemade.blogspot.com/2011/07/renaming-blog-some-things-i-have-won.html Thanks for posting!

joanie said...

hello. i just discovered your blog and am fascinated with the history of clothing patterns. thanks for all of the teriffic information.

PatternVault said...

There was a wonderful/creepy children's version from the early '30s on eBay recently, Pictorial Review 5477
(http://cgi.ebay.com/Vtg-1920s-Pictorial-Review-Girls-Full-Apron-Cap-Pattern-/130546565721?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1e652e8259).
I was fascinated to see what was clearly a girls' service uniform.. Hope you were the winner!

andrea.at.the.blue.door said...

PatternVault - I missed that girl's Hoover-front apron and cap - it's a nice one! Another explanation is that that apron and cap were worn by girls in their Home Economics classes to keep their school clothes clean.

scrapiana said...

Ooh, have just happened across your blog and am delighted! Looking forward to further exploration.

Steph in Kansas said...

I do living history and the working clothes are the hardest patterns to find. Thanks for sharing-I only wish I could find those gems here in the midwest. I look forward to your blogs on my lunch break at work. Thanks for sharing.

Jennifer Hawkins Hock said...

I was curious about your blog title and fascinated by your explanation of being interested in utilitarian sewing patterns. Your idea is unique and I'll certainly be visiting again!
My blog is sewatoile.blogspot.com and I'm usually looking for what IS considered fashionable, but love your perspective. So glad I came across "Unsung Sewing Patterns" while searching for Pictorial Review patterns.

andrea.at.the.blue.door said...

Hello Jennifer, and welcome to the Unsung 'hood. While I collect mainly utilitarian patterns, sometimes one of the stylish ones leaps out at me, such as a 1920's Chanel pattern offered by McCall's, which I blogged about on my other blog: http://www.andreacesari.com/2009/10/coco.html